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“Television Media Played Into Republicans’ Hands”: TV News Does A Complete 180 On Ebola Coverage After Midterms

Network news coverage of the Ebola virus abruptly and dramatically fell off following the midterm elections earlier this month, according to a new study by Media Matters.

After reviewing transcripts from Oct. 7 to Nov. 17 in the 5-11 p.m. time slot, Media Matters discovered that evening broadcast and cable news programs aired close to 1,000 segments on Ebola in the four weeks leading up to the elections, and only 49 segments in the two weeks that followed.

“In early October, the GOP developed a plan to make the federal government’s response to Ebola a central part of its midterm elections strategy,” the study reads. “Television media played into Republicans’ hands, helping to foment panic about the disease.”

CNN showed the most significant decrease in Ebola coverage following the midterms, airing 335 segments in the weeks leading up to Election Day and just 10 in the period after. Fox News’ coverage fell from 281 segments to 10, and MSNBC recorded a disparity of 222 segments to 13.

Broadcast networks showed a pronounced dip in their Ebola coverage as well.

“CBS’ 54 segments dropped to six, NBC’s 44 segments dropped to five, and ABC’s 39 segments dropped to four,” according to the study.

But even before the compilation of this data — before the correlation between Ebola and the midterm elections became so clear — the media faced harsh criticism for the fervor and panic with which it reported on a virus that had only infected, at most, a handful of U.S. citizens.

In October, Fox News’ Shepard Smith scolded his colleagues in the press for their “irresponsible” and “hysterical” handling of the story.

USA Today columnist Rem Rieder, notes Media Matters, called the “breathless, alarmist reports” on Ebola “the antithesis of what responsible journalists should be doing,” in a piece published a week prior to the midterms.

And despite all the reports and panels, and the hours upon hours of segments leading up to Election Day, the coverage was still rife with misinformation and largely incomplete. News outlets obsessively scrutinized the handling of few isolated cases of Ebola within the U.S. while all but ignoring the thousands dying from the disease at the source of the outbreak.

“If poor media coverage can create an atmosphere of anxiety and misinformation, then the right kind of coverage can lead to a more active and productive public response,” Jason Linkins wrote for The Huffington Post in October. “To achieve this, the media needs to recognize that the true center of gravity in the Ebola story is the crisis in West Africa.”

 

By: Jackson Connor, The Huffington Post Blog, November 19, 2014

 

November 20, 2014 - Posted by | Ebola, Media, Midterm Elections | , , , , , , , , , ,

3 Comments »

  1. they’ve done a good job of it. These people are not stupid. They knew exactly what they were doing.

    Like

    Comment by renxkyoko | November 20, 2014 | Reply

    • From the media’s prospective, anything for ratings including hype and fear…facts and accurate information be damned.

      Like

      Comment by raemd95 | November 20, 2014 | Reply

  2. Imagine an NFL game between two evenly matched teams and then imagine it again without the referees. One or both teams will cheat with no one there to call penalties. Then look at our politics with so much at stake and the media abdicating their responsibility to ensure that both sides don’t cheat on campaign financing and don’t stray too far from the facts. Then imagine our free market economy without government rules to protect consumers, the environment, and provide infrastructure. This is what the GOP and the 1% want. Does anyone believe that a free, competitive market will not be crowded with those who will cheat to take advantage of others? It takes the active enforcement of the law by the IRS, the FBI, the SEC and others to ensure that people don’t cheat.

    Like

    Comment by walthe310 | November 20, 2014 | Reply


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