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“A Pill For Every Ill”: Consumer Drug Advertising Should Be Banned

Consumer advertising of prescription drugs is a massive public health experiment in which billions of dollars are spent each year. But this advertising is a blunt instrument where a sharp edge is needed.

Drugs have harms as well as benefits, and the harms are greater when drugs are indiscriminately prescribed. Consumer advertising, delivered to the masses as a shotgun blast, rather than as specific information to concerned patients or caregivers, results in more prescriptions and less appropriate prescribing.

There is no evidence that consumer ads improve treatment quality or result in earlier provision of needed care. Research has shown that the ads convey an unbalanced picture, with benefits and emotional appeals given far greater weight than risks. Clinicians can work to override these miscues, but this steals precious time from activities that can provide real benefit to patients. In the packed agenda of the patient visit, in which so many real concerns and evidence-based care are available to make a difference in people’s lives, the intrusion of marketing risks harm.

Advertising also provokes a subtle shift in our culture — toward seeking a pill for every ill. While there are many for whom stimulants and other medications can be a godsend, the case of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a prime example of how, too often, a pill substitutes for more human responses to distress. U.S. clinicians prescribe stimulant medication for A.D.H.D. at a rate 25 times that of their European counterparts. The complex decision to start a long-term medication should be motivated by the observations of teachers and parents and children, in the context of a relationship with a caring clinician − not stimulated by rosy ads.

Consumer drug advertising is banned in most of the world, although pharmaceutical companies are making a full-court press on the European Union, even while violating the limited guidelines for that advertising in the United States.

In the information age, in which more balanced sources of information on drugs should be widely available, biased pill-pushing messages are a public health menace. To advance the health of the public, the United States should follow the lead of the vast majority of countries, and ban direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising.

 

By: Kurt C. Strange, Room for Debate, The New York Times, December 15, 2013

December 16, 2013 - Posted by | Pharmaceutical Companies, Public Health | , , , , , , ,

1 Comment »

  1. I don’t know how much it helps when advertising is done through doctors either. They will rely on information from drug reps rather than reading original research. Some become shills for the drug companies. And some just don’t keep up and don’t know about new drugs. I do think we are overly reliant on pharmaceuticals, but if we really want to ban ads, we need to reform the health system to have more public finding for the development of drugs and for disseminating information about them.

    Like

    Comment by 1humanwoman | December 16, 2013 | Reply


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